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Q:

What are some good ways to make potty training work for a toddler who is not motivated by rewards or incentives?

Hi everyone,

I am a mother of a 2-year-old toddler who still struggles with potty training. We have tried using rewards and incentives like sticker charts, candy treats, and toys, but it seems he is not motivated by any of these things. He just doesn't seem interested in using the potty or showing any enthusiasm for rewards.

I'm at a loss on how to make potty training work for him. We have tried reading books and showing him videos to educate him about the importance of using the potty, but it's not working.

I would appreciate any tips or advice from parents who have faced similar challenges or from experts who have insight on how to make potty training work for a toddler who is not motivated by rewards or incentives. Thank you in advance for your help!

All Replies

reinhold.welch

Hello everyone,

I also had the experience of potty training a toddler who was not motivated by rewards or incentives. What worked best for us was making it a team effort. We involved our family and close friends in the potty training process, and they would cheer our son on every time he successfully used the potty.

Moreover, we avoided using diapers except at bedtime to avoid confusion in our kid's mind, which was helpful. Additionally, we used a transparent potty trainer so that our son could understand the process better and learn by seeing what was happening.

We also made sure to be patient and not get frustrated or disappointed when accidents happened. We remained calm and kept reinforcing the importance of using the potty in a positive manner.

Finally, we made sure to be consistent and had our son sit on the potty at regular intervals, which helped him to develop a routine and learn good habits around bathroom use.

These strategies made our potty training process more manageable and helped us not to give up. Remember that every child is different, and not all strategies may work. So it's essential to find the one that works best for your child and be patient throughout the journey.

meaghan95

Hi there,

I can definitely relate to your struggle as I faced a similar challenge with my son when he was younger. He wasn't motivated by rewards or incentives either, and it was a real challenge to get him to use the potty consistently.

One thing that helped us was to make it a fun and interactive experience for him. We would sing songs and make silly faces while he sat on the potty, which seemed to make him more willing to try it out. We also encouraged him with positive reinforcement, telling him how proud we were each time he used the potty.

Another thing that worked well for us was to let him pick out his own potty seat and underwear. This seemed to make him more invested in the process and gave him a sense of ownership over his own potty training journey.

Overall, I found that patience and persistence were key. Every child is different, and it may take some time to figure out what motivates your toddler to use the potty. Just keep trying and don't get discouraged - eventually, it will click and your child will be potty trained before you know it!

rkuhn

Hello,

I had the same issue when potty training my daughter, who also wasn't motivated by rewards or incentives. One thing that worked for us was to give her plenty of opportunities to practice using the potty, even if it meant having to change multiple pairs of underwear a day.

We also made sure that she was comfortable during potty time by using a stool to help her reach the potty and sitting with her so she didn't feel scared or lonely.

Another strategy that we implemented was to use a specific phrase or keyword that helped her associate going potty with the action. We used "busy," so when we asked her if she needed to go potty, we would say, "Are you busy? Do you need to go busy?" It seemed to work well as a cue for her to use the potty.

Lastly, we tried to make it a fun and positive experience for her. We would sing silly songs or tell funny stories while she was sitting on the potty to help her relax and not feel pressured.

I hope these tips help you with potty training your toddler. Remember that every child is different, and what works for one may not work for another, so don't be discouraged if it takes some time or trial and error to find what works best for your child. Good luck!

doyle.maryam

Hello all,

Like many others on this forum, I too had the experience of potty training a toddler not motivated by traditional rewards and incentives. What worked for us was to give our son more autonomy and control during the process.

Initially, we found that he was hesitant to use the potty because he didn't feel in control of the situation. So we began to involve him in the decision-making process, and we let him choose when he wanted to try and use the potty. This not only gave him more control but helped him to understand the natural urge to use the bathroom.

We also encouraged him to take ownership of his potty training journey by letting him pick out his own underwear and pants. This made him feel responsible for his clothing and more invested in potty training.

Another thing that worked well for us was to give him praise and attention every time he used the potty, even if it was just a little bit. This helped to build his confidence and saw that we cared about his progress.

In summary, we found giving our son more control and ownership over his potty training, as well as giving him lots of praise and attention when he succeeded, was the best way to overcome a lack of motivation towards rewards and incentives. Remember that every child is different and it may take some time to figure out what works best for your toddler.

uhartmann

Hello everyone,

When potty training my daughter who wasn't motivated by rewards or incentives, I found that modeling the behavior and making it a part of daily life was the most helpful. So, we made sure to involve her in the bathroom routine as much as possible, including letting her come to the bathroom with us and showing her how we used the toilet.

We also made sure to keep the process as simple as possible. We used basic language when talking about going potty or using the toilet, and we made sure to use child-friendly words that she could understand.

Another thing that worked well was to let her take the lead in the process. We waited until she showed interest in using the potty and then let her take the lead in deciding when and how to use it. This gave her a sense of control and ownership over the process and helped her to feel more confident.

Finally, we made sure to be patient and not pressure her or make her feel bad when accidents happened. We continued to encourage her and celebrate her successes, no matter how small they were.

Overall, we found that making potty training a natural part of daily life, using simple language, and letting our daughter take the lead helped her to overcome a lack of motivation towards rewards and incentives.

kailey.hermann

Hi there,

I also struggled with a toddler who was not motivated by rewards or incentives during potty training. What worked for us was incorporating a routine and schedule around bathroom breaks. Consistency is key, and it helped my child understand when it was time to use the potty.

We also used a timer to make it a game for him. We set the time for every 30 minutes and let him race to the bathroom to see if he could beat the timer. It was a fun way to get him excited and motivated to use the potty.

Additionally, we used books and videos to teach him about the importance of using the potty. There are many great resources out there, both online and in bookstores that are geared towards encouraging children to use the potty.

Lastly, we found that leading by example was important. When my child saw us using the bathroom and going potty, it normalized the behavior for him and made him more comfortable with the process.

In summary, we found that routines, games, using resources, and setting a good example worked best for our child who was not motivated by rewards or incentives. Just like anything else, it took time, patience, and consistency, but eventually, it all clicked for our child, and he was potty trained in no time.

bparisian

Hi everyone,

When we were potty training our son who was not motivated by rewards or incentives, we found that routine and repetition were key. We established a regular routine around bathroom breaks and made sure to stick to it as much as possible.

We also repeated the same phrases and words to associate with bathroom use, so our child could understand what was happening. For instance, we used the word "potty" consistently when asking our child if he needed to go, which helped him to recognize what we were asking.

Another thing that worked well for us was to gradually increase the amount of time between bathroom breaks. Although this meant more accidents in the beginning, we found that our son was able to hold it longer and use the potty more successfully after a few days or weeks.

Moreover, we found that providing positive reinforcement for every effort, no matter how small, was important. We praised him every time he tried to use the potty or when he told us that he needed to go, even if he didn't succeed.

In conclusion, we found that routine, repetition, and praise were key to potty training a toddler who was not motivated by rewards or incentives. While it may take some time and patience, it's important to persist and remain positive throughout the process.

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