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Q:

Should I use rewards or incentives during potty training?

Hi everyone,

I am a first-time mom and currently going through the potty training phase with my two-year-old daughter. I have read a lot about the different methods and techniques to potty train kids, and one thing that comes up a lot is the use of rewards or incentives to encourage and motivate them.

I am a bit conflicted about this approach, as I don't want my daughter to learn that she only gets rewarded for doing something that should be a normal part of daily life. At the same time, I also understand that positive reinforcement can be effective in reinforcing good behavior.

So, I wanted to ask the experienced parents out there - did you use rewards or incentives during potty training? If so, what kind of rewards worked best for your kids? Would you recommend this approach, or is there a better way to motivate them without resorting to rewards?

Any insights or advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!

All Replies

nkohler

Hello,

I'm a father to a two-year-old son and we are currently in the midst of potty training. Initially, we tried using rewards, but quickly realized that it wasn't effective for our son.

Instead of giving him incentives, we decided to make potty training fun and enjoyable for him. We would encourage him to sit on the potty and read books or sing songs together. This helped him feel more comfortable and relaxed on the potty, making it a more positive experience.

We also found that letting him pick his own underwear helped him feel more involved in the process. He loves superheroes, so we bought him underwear with his favorite characters on them, which made him excited to wear them and motivated him to keep his undies dry.

We try to stay positive and supportive, and celebrate both big and small accomplishments. For example, we'll praise him for sitting on the potty even if he doesn't go, or give him a high-five when he does go.

In my opinion, every child responds differently to different approaches, and it's important to find what works best for your child. For us, making potty training a fun and positive experience has been the most effective method.

Good luck to everyone who is currently in the potty training phase! It's a journey, but it's also a great opportunity to bond with your child and celebrate their milestones.

ntowne

Hello,

I'm a father to a four-year-old son, and when we went through potty training, we decided not to use rewards or incentives. We didn't want our son to feel like he was only potty training to get something in return.

Instead, we tried to make potty training a natural and normal part of daily life. We would talk to our son about using the potty and encourage him to try, but we didn't put any pressure on him to perform. We also made sure to praise him when he did use the potty, but we didn't offer any rewards.

At times, this approach felt like it was taking longer than it would have with rewards, but we wanted our son to learn that potty training was just something he had to do, like brushing his teeth or putting on his shoes. We felt that this would help him become more independent and responsible in the long run.

In the end, our son did figure it out on his own time, and he's now fully potty trained. Looking back, I think we made the right choice for our family, but I understand that everyone's situation is different.

I do think it's important to remember that every child is unique, and what works for one may not work for another. It's important to find an approach that feels comfortable and natural for your family, and to be patient and supportive throughout the process.

Good luck to all the parents out there who are currently in the midst of potty training!

dasia.lakin

Hello there,

I'm a father of a three-year-old son, and when we were potty training him, we decided not to use rewards or incentives. Instead, we focused more on positive reinforcement and praise.

Every time our son successfully used the potty, we would cheer and shower him with compliments. We also made sure to acknowledge and celebrate his efforts, even if he didn't quite make it to the potty in time. This approach worked well for us, and it helped to build his confidence and self-esteem.

We found that by using praise and positive language, our son became more motivated to use the potty and was excited to show us his progress. We also noticed that he didn't become reliant on rewards, and instead, he viewed potty training as a natural part of growing up.

Of course, every child is different, and what worked best for us may not work for everyone. However, I do believe that it's possible to potty train without rewards, and it’s important to find an approach that feels comfortable and natural for you and your child.

Remember, it's not a competition, and every child learns at their own pace. So take your time, be patient, and celebrate each step of the way.

Best of luck with your potty training journey!

konopelski.elwin

Hey there,

As a mom to a four-year-old daughter, I can definitely relate to your concerns about using rewards or incentives during potty training. When we started potty training, we tried using a small treat as a reward for successful potty runs. But we quickly noticed that this wasn't very effective for our daughter.

Instead, we found that using verbal encouragement and a positive attitude toward potty training was much more motivating for her. We praised her when she successfully went to the potty, and we didn't make a big deal out of accidents. We also let her choose her own big girl undies, which made her feel more confident and proud of herself.

Positive reinforcement works best for our daughter, and we continue to use it even now when she accomplishes other things in her life. We try to keep it genuine and specific, and always acknowledge her efforts so she knows how proud we are of her.

I understand that every child is different, and what works for one might not work for another. I think it's important to try different techniques to see what works best for your child. It's also important to remember that potty training is a process and can take time. But with patience, encouragement, and positivity, your child will eventually get there.

Hope this helps!

zbauch

Hi there,

I'm a mom to a three-year-old daughter and we went through potty training not too long ago. Like many parents, we were unsure about whether or not to use rewards or incentives.

Ultimately, we decided to use small rewards like stickers or a small piece of candy every time she used the potty successfully. However, we made sure to praise and encourage her regardless of whether or not she received a reward. We also tried to taper off the rewards over time, so that she wouldn't become too reliant on them.

To be honest, I wasn't entirely comfortable with using rewards at first, as I didn't want her to think that she only did it for the reward. But I found that it was a really effective tool for us, and it made potty training go much more smoothly.

I think every child is different, and what works for one may not work for another. In the end, it's important to find an approach that feels right for you and your child, and to be consistent in your approach.

Potty training can be a challenge, but it's also a great opportunity to bond with your child and help them feel confident in their abilities.

Best of luck to all parents going through the potty training phase!

harber.clark

Hi there,

I am a mom of two kids, and I used rewards during potty training with both of them. In my experience, using incentives helped to create a positive association with using the potty and made the process more enjoyable for them.

For my oldest child, we used a sticker chart where she would earn a sticker each time she successfully used the potty. Once she earned a certain number of stickers, she would get to choose a small prize like a toy or a treat. This worked really well for her, and she was fully potty trained within a few weeks.

For my youngest child, we took a slightly different approach and used a reward jar. Whenever she successfully used the potty, she would get to put a marble in the jar. Once the jar was full, she got to choose a bigger reward like a trip to the zoo or a movie day at home. She was a bit more stubborn than her sister, but the reward jar definitely helped to motivate her.

I understand your concerns about not wanting your child to only do things for rewards, but I think it's important to remember that potty training is a big milestone for them and it's okay to celebrate their successes. As long as you're not over-relying on rewards or using them as a bribe, they can be a helpful tool in encouraging and motivating them.

Good luck with your potty training journey!

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