Loading Kindness - Spinning Up Mommy Magic

While the Love Loads, Our Spinner Spins. Get Ready to Share, Support, and Bond with Like-minded Moms!

Popular Searches:
446
Q:

How can I handle potty training while traveling?

Hello everyone,

I am a first-time parent and planning to take my toddler on a road trip. My child is almost ready for potty training, but I am concerned about how to handle potty breaks during travel. I don't want to end up with a messy situation when we are on the road or in public areas. Does anyone have any tips or recommendations on how to handle potty training while traveling? Any advice will be much appreciated. Thank you in advance!

All Replies

ceasar.smitham

Hello everyone,

I've traveled with my child while potty training, and the experience can be quite challenging. I would like to share some tips that made our trips more manageable:

1. Use a travel potty: Carrying a travel potty with you can be a lifesaver when there are limited or no restrooms available for use. This way, your child can use the potty conveniently in the car or outside.

2. Map out your stops: Prioritize your rest stops when planning your itinerary, and choose the ones that are clean, well-maintained, and have multiple toilets available. This reduces the chances of waiting in line, and it affords you the time to get your child to the restroom quickly.

3. Carry a change of clothes: Even if your child is potty trained, accidents can still happen, and it's wise to carry an extra change of clothes. Place them in the diaper bag or carry-on, and have them easily accessible.

4. Make time for breaks: Children need to move around to stretch their legs, rest their eyes, and use the restroom. Allow for at least a ten-minute break every one to two hours to accommodate these needs.

5. Keep on praising and encouraging: Potty training is challenging, but when you encourage and praise your child, the process feels like a success in the making. Celebrating small milestones and wins along the way is essential.

Remember, potty training takes time, patience, and a great deal of effort. At times, it may feel challenging, but keep in mind that your child will eventually learn, and it's worth it in the end. Good luck!

ethyl64

Hi there,

I completely understand your concerns as I have been in the same situation. Potty training while travelling can be a stressful experience but there are a few things you can do to make it easier for you and your little one.

1. Be consistent in your routine: Stick to your potty training routine as much as possible while travelling. This will help your child adapt to using different bathrooms.

2. Use pull-ups or diapers for long trips: If your child is not fully potty trained, it may be helpful to use pull-ups or diapers for the duration of the trip. This can make for less stressful situations if your child has an accident.

3. Familiarize your child with public bathrooms: If your child is hesitant to use public restrooms, familiarize them with it by visiting a restroom together and explaining how to use it.

4. Use a travel potty seat: Using a travel potty seat can make public restrooms more comfortable and familiar for your child. These are small and portable, and can be easily stored in your vehicle.

5. Reward your child: Reward your child for successful trips to the bathroom. This can help them stay motivated and feel proud of their successful potty training.

Remember to stay positive and patient with your child during the process. With time, they will become more comfortable using public restrooms and potty training will become easier. Good luck and have a great trip!

bergnaum.sallie

Hi everyone,

I have traveled with my toddler who was in the middle of potty training and had a bit of a challenge initially, but then discovered a few hacks that made the trip bearable.

1. Pack a waterproof liner: To prevent car-seat accidents, put a waterproof liner underneath your child on their car seat. This saved my child's car seat from a few accidents and saved us from having to clean the entire seat on the trip.

2. Establish routine: Establish a routine for your child, especially for when you are in transit. It could be sitting your child on a portable potty at every pit stop or going to the bathroom before you start driving. This gets them in the habit of using the restroom regularly and mitigating accidents.

3. Incentivize your child: Rewarding your child during the trip for using the restroom and staying dry is an excellent way to motivate them. It could be with a sticker or a small toy. This will keep them excited about the process.

4. Plan your route carefully: If your child has a regular potty schedule, take note of it while planning the trip route. Try to reach a city or location with known and accessible restrooms around the time your child usually uses the restroom. This way, you prevent your journey from being a long drawn-out one.

5. Take time to relax: Finally, take things slow and relax. The potty training process can be a bit stressful for both you and your child, so do not be anxious or hard on yourself.

These tips have helped me travel successfully with my toddler while potty training, and I hope they help you too!

kessler.oma

Hi there,

I have also traveled with my toddler while potty training, and it can definitely be tricky. Here are a few more tips that may help:

1. Schedule potty breaks: Make sure to plan frequent bathroom stops, even if your child says they don't need to go. This will help prevent accidents and keep your child in the habit of using the restroom regularly.

2. Bring a portable potty: In addition to a travel potty seat, consider bringing a small portable potty. You can use it in the car or at a rest stop if the public restroom is not available or not clean.

3. Practice at home: In the weeks leading up to your trip, practice using different bathrooms with your child. This can help them be more comfortable using unfamiliar bathrooms during your travels.

4. Pack plenty of snacks and drinks: Make sure to pack plenty of snacks and drinks to prevent dehydration and promote regular bathroom use.

5. Use positive reinforcement: Potty training is all about positive reinforcement. Praise your child for successful trips to the bathroom and be patient when accidents happen.

Remember to keep a positive attitude and be prepared for the unexpected. With some planning and patience, you can make potty training while traveling a success. Good luck!

aimee.carroll

Hello all,

I have traveled with my toddler who had just started potty training, and I understand the challenges of dealing with bathroom needs while on the go. Here are some tips that I found helpful:

1. Bring a foldable potty seat: A foldable potty seat can be a lifesaver, as it allows your child to sit comfortably on any toilet seat, no matter where you are. It takes up very little space in your luggage and can be easily washed and dried.

2. Use restroom locator apps: There are plenty of apps available that can help locate clean and accessible toilets within a certain radius. This takes away the stress of finding restrooms on unfamiliar routes or in unfamiliar places.

3. Dress your child in loose-fitting clothes: Dressing your child in loose-fitting clothes can make bathroom trips easier, as they can quickly pull them down and up without struggling.

4. Try elimination communication: Elimination communication is a method of potty training that involves observing your child's elimination cues and taking them to the toilet accordingly. This can be particularly helpful when on the go.

5. Take turns with your partner: If you are traveling with a partner, take turns accompanying your child to the restroom so that the other person can relax or drive.

Remember, potty training is a learning process, and accidents are bound to happen. Be prepared and flexible, and your trip should go smoothly. I hope these tips help, and happy travels!

aufderhar.monique

Hi there,

I recently went on a road trip with my toddler who had just started potty training, and I can relate to your concerns. Here are some tips that worked for me:

1. Plan ahead: Before hitting the road, make sure to research rest stops and restaurants with clean and accessible restrooms along your route. Knowing where to stop ahead of time can help reduce stress and anxiety.

2. Bring a portable potty: If you're going to be on the road for a long time, consider investing in a portable potty. They are convenient and easy to use, and can be a lifesaver when there are no restrooms nearby.

3. Pack extra clothes: Accidents happen, especially during potty training. Make sure to pack extra clothes, underwear, and wipes in case of any mishaps.

4. Be patient: Potty training is a learning process, and it may take some time for your child to get used to using the restroom in different places. Be patient and encourage them to try their best, and don't get frustrated if there are setbacks.

I hope these tips help! Good luck with your travels and potty training journey.

fpfeffer

Hi everyone,

I've traveled several times with my child who was potty training, and I can understand the concerns and worries that come with it. Here are a few tips and tricks that worked for me:

1. Be flexible: The most important thing to remember when potty training your child while traveling is to stay flexible. Things may be more challenging than when at home, so be prepared to modify your plan and maintain an open mind.

2. Make it fun: It's essential to make going to the bathroom a fun experience for your child. This may include incorporating toys or music to make the experience less scary and more enjoyable.

3. Carry disinfectant wipes: Disinfectant wipes are a must-have when traveling with your child. Public restrooms are not always the most hygienic, and wipes will keep the surfaces clean and germ-free.

4. Time your fluids: Timing drinks and food appropriately goes a long way in avoiding accidents. Avoid giving your child drinks that may cause frequent urination, like soda and juice.

5. Teach your child to know their bodily cues: Teach your child to recognize early indicators that they need to go potty. This way, they can tell you and have a higher probability of using only the available restrooms.

Potty training while traveling with your child requires your patience, flexibility, and tons of positive reinforcement. If you're traveling with a partner, it's always wise to have them assist you in this process. Remember, every child is unique, and potty training takes time, significance and patience.

zgoodwin

Hi everyone,

I have travelled with my toddler in the past who was potty training, and I know it can be overwhelming at times. Here are some tips that worked for us.

1. Provide plenty of reminders and incentives: To encourage your child to stay on track with potty training while travelling, provide plenty of reminders and incentives. It can be in a form of a toy incentive or a tasty treat. Having these reminders and rewards can boost their motivation and make the process easier.

2. Use disposable potty liners: Investing in disposable potty liners can save you the trouble of cleaning your travel potty after every use. These are also very convenient to pack and can fit in your small potty bag.

3. Bring extra toilet paper/wipes: Sometimes, public restrooms can have inadequate supplies of toilet paper/wipes, and it can become challenging to manage. Be adequately prepared with extra toilet paper or wipes to avoid any hassle.

4. Find a private spot for emergencies: When traveling in the open highway, finding restrooms can be difficult, and your child may require an emergency stop. Try to find a quiet spot away from the road, where your child can have some privacy while you attend to them.

5. Get your child to use the restroom regularly: Reminding your child to use the restroom regularly can prevent accidents and make the process go smoothly. Be consistent with your reminders and make it part of their daily routine.

These tips can help make potty training while traveling more successful and less stressful. Remember to take it slow, be patient and reward your child's efforts.

New to Kind Mommy Community?

Join the community